Katihar – Tourism

Bihar State Tourism Development Corporation (BSTDC) was established in the year 1981 for the development of tourism in the State of Bihar and for commercialisation of Tourist Resources available with the State. To achieve this objective various tourist infrastructure like Tourist Bungalow, Cafetaria, Restaurant, Transportation facilities and Ropeway are provided at various tourists spots by Bihar State Tourism Development Corporation. BSTDC has taken major initiatives to show the potential of tourist places of Bihar to the World. This website is an effort to provide easy information to the tourists visiting Bihar. It aims to provide information related to important tourist places of Bihar and Jharkhand State. The details of available facilites such as Accomodation, Transport, Tour Packages, Tourist Information Centers are available with the site. Bihar‘s antiquity is evident from its name, which is derived from “VIHARA” (monastery). It is indeed a land of monasteries. Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, Muslim and Sikh shrines abound in this ancient land where India‘s first major empires rose and fell. Where the ruins of the worlds’ earliest university slumbers in the void of time, while modern day giant steel complexes spew fire all the year round.

Forty percent of India‘s mineral wealth lies buried in its boosom. The passage of Ganga, flowing wide and deep enrich the plains of Bihar before distributing in Bengal’s deltoid zone.Among all Indian states, Bihar is the one most intimately linked to the Buddha’s life, resulting in a trail of pilgrimages which have come to be known as the Buddhist circuit. The Buddhist trail begins at the capital city, Patna, where a noteworthy museum contains a collection of Hindu and Buddhist sculptures.The Khuda Baksh Oriental Library has rare Muslim manuscripts including some from the University of Cordoba in Spain. 40 km away, Vaishali, was the site for the second Buddhist Council is the presence of ruins testify. 90 km south of Patna is Nalanda which translates as the place that confers the lotus’ (of spiritual knowledge). A monastic university flourished here from the 5th to the 11th century. It is said to have contained nine million books, with 2,000 teachers to impart knowledge to 10,000 students who came from all over the Buddhist world. Lord Buddha himself taught here and Hieun Tsang, the 7th century Chinese traveler, was a student. Ongoing excavations have uncovered temples, monasteries and lecture halls. Rajgir, ‘the royal palace’, 12 km south, was the venue for the first Buddhist Council.The Buddha spent five years at Rajgir after having attained enlightenment, and many of the remains at Rajgir commemorate various incidents, the hill of Gridhrakuta being perhaps the most important, as this is where the Buddha delivered most of his sermons. Bodhgaya is the spot where Lord Buddha attained enlightenment, with the Mahabodhi Temple marking the precise location. Bihar’s Buddhist circuit has modest back-up facilities by way of accommodation, international dining and surface transport.Magadh rose to glory again during the Guptas(4th and 5th centuries AD) followed by the Palas of Bangal, who ruled until 1197. Muslim rule, which lasted from the 12th to 17th century, has left an indelible mark on Bihar. The British acquired Bihar in 1764 in the Battle of Buxar and ruled until India‘s Independence 1947. In its early history, from the 6th century BC to 5th century AD, the region was repeatedly the coveted seat of major empires. Ajatshatru, second in the line of the Magadh kings, ruled from Rajgir. The 4th century BC saw the rise of the Maurya dynasty to which Ashoka belonged.This landlocked state is surrounded by Nepal, Bengal, Orissa, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh and comprises four cultural regions-Bhojpur, Mithila, Magadha and Chotanagpur. Rivers Kosi and Gandak from the north and Sone from the south join the Ganga. River Damodar flows through the picturesque Chotanagpur plateau and its valley is the Rohr of India. In the fertile plains, rice, sugarcane, oilseeds, gram, maize, jute, barley and wheat are cultivated. Under the soil, Bihar has either ruins or minerals.Vaishali: Vaishali was one of the earliest republics in the world (6th century BC).It was here that Buddha preached his last sermon. Vaishali, birthplace of Lord Mahavira is also Sacred to Jains.Patna: Patna once called Patliputra the capital of Bihar, is among the world’s oldest capital cities with unbroken history of many centuries as imperial metropolis.Rajgir: Rajgir,19 kms from Nalanda, the ancient capital of Magadh Empire.Lord Buddha often visited the monastery here to meditate and to preach. Rajgir is also a place sacred to the Jains, Since Lord Mahavira spent many years here.Pawapuri: In Pawapuri, or Apapuri, 38 kilometres from Rajgir and 90 kilometres from Patna, all sins end for a devout Jain. Lord Mahavira, the final tirthankar and founder of Jainism, breathed his last at this place.Deoghar(Baidyanath Dham): Deoghar, the House of Gods, is a popular health resort and an important center of Hindu pilgrimage, having the ancient temple of Baba Baidyanath – one of the twelve Jyotilingas in India.Parasnath: It is the place where several Jain Temple Exist. Buddhist Circuit TopBodhgaya: Near the holy city of Gaya, the Buddha attained enlightebment. The tree that had sheltered him came to be known as the Bodhi tree and the place Bodhgaya. Today Bodhgaya, an important place of piligirmage, has a number of monasteries.Rajgir: Rajgir,19 kms from Nalanda, the ancient capital of Magadh Empire.Lord Buddha often visited the monastery here to meditate and to preach. Rajgir is also a place sacred to the Jains, Since Lord Mahavira spent many years here.Nalanda: A great centre of Buddhist learning, Nalanda came into around the 5th century BC and was a flourishing university town with over ten thousand scholars and an extensive library.Patna: Patna once called Patliputra the capital of Bihar,is among the world’s oldest capital cities with unbroken history of many centuries as imperial metropolis.Vaishali: Vaishali was one of the earliest republics in the world (6th century BC).It was here that Buddha preached his last sermon. Vaishali, birthplace of Lord Mahavira is also Sacred to Jains. Nirvana Circuit TopRajgir: Rajgir,19 kms from Nalanda, the ancient capital of Magadh Empire.Lord Buddha often visited the monastery here to meditate and to preach. Rajgir is also a place sacred to the Jains, Since Lord Mahavira spent many years here.Bodhgaya: Near the holy city of Gaya, the Buddha attained enlightebment. The tree that had sheltered him came to be known as the Bodhi tree and the place Bodhgaya. Today Bodhgaya, an important place of piligirmage, has a number of monasteries.Kushinagar: 53 km west of Gorakhpur.Kushinagar is where the Lord Buddha breathed his last and achieved mahaparinirvana. Their are ruins here of many stupas as well as the chaityas and viharas that wehe built in latter times.Muzaffarpur: 35 km from Vaishali.Muzaffarpur the “Lychee Kingdom”, is one of the major towns of North Bihar, a short distance from other popular tourist spots Hazipur and Sonepur.Today Muzaffarpur is famous for its exotic fruit “LYCHEE”.Vaishali: One of the earliest republics in the world (6th century BC).It was here that Buddha preached his last sermon. Vaishali, birthplace of Lord Mahavira is also Sacred to Jains.Patna: Patna once called Patliputra the capital of Bihar,is among the world’s oldest capital cities with unbroken history of many centuries as imperial metropolis.Nalanda: A great centre of Buddhist learning, Nalanda came into around the 5th century BC and was a flourishing university town with over ten thousand scholars and an extensive library. BSTDC have some readymade packaged tour facility, for following tourist destinations, which Interested people/tourists can avail. But other than this corporation also entertain customized packaged tours request. Tourist can send in their request to head office at Patna by email or by phone.Bihar’s antiquity is evident from its name, which is derived from “VIHARA” (monastery). It is indeed a land of monasteries. Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, Muslim and Sikh shrines abound in this ancient land where India‘s first major empires rose and fell. Where the ruins of the worlds’ earliest university slumbers in the void of time, while modern day giant steel complexes spew fire all the year round. Forty percent of India‘s mineral wealth lies buried in its boosom. The passage of Ganga, flowing wide and deep enrich the plains of Bihar before distributing in Bengal‘s deltoid zone.

Among all Indian states, Bihar is the one most intimately linked to the Buddha’s life, resulting in a trail of pilgrimages which have come to be known as the Buddhist circuit. The Buddhist trail begins at the capital city, Patna, where a noteworthy museum contains a collection of Hindu and Buddhist sculptures.

The Khuda Baksh Oriental Library has rare Muslim manuscripts including some from the University of Cordoba in Spain. 40 km away, Vaishali, was the site for the second Buddhist Council is the presence of ruins testify. 90 km south of Patna is Nalanda which translates as the place that confers the lotus’ (of spiritual knowledge). A monastic university flourished here from the 5th to the 11th century. It is said to have contained nine million books, with 2,000 teachers to impart knowledge to 10,000 students who came from all over the Buddhist world. Lord Buddha himself taught here and Hieun Tsang, the 7th century Chinese traveler, was a student. Ongoing excavations have uncovered temples, monasteries and lecture halls. Rajgir, ‘the royal palace’, 12 km south, was the venue for the first Buddhist Council.

The Buddha spent five years at Rajgir after having attained enlightenment, and many of the remains at Rajgir commemorate various incidents, the hill of Gridhrakuta being perhaps the most important, as this is where the Buddha delivered most of his sermons. Bodhgaya is the spot where Lord Buddha attained enlightenment, with the Mahabodhi Temple marking the precise location. Bihar’s Buddhist circuit has modest back-up facilities by way of accommodation, international dining and surface transport.

Magadh rose to glory again during the Guptas(4th and 5th centuries AD) followed by the Palas of Bangal, who ruled until 1197. Muslim rule, which lasted from the 12th to 17th century, has left an indelible mark on Bihar. The British acquired Bihar in 1764 in the Battle of Buxar and ruled until India‘s Independence 1947. In its early history, from the 6th century BC to 5th century AD, the region was repeatedly the coveted seat of major empires. Ajatshatru, second in the line of the Magadh kings, ruled from Rajgir. The 4th century BC saw the rise of the Maurya dynasty to which Ashoka belonged.

This landlocked state is surrounded by Nepal, Bengal, Orissa, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh and comprises four cultural regions-Bhojpur, Mithila, Magadha and Chotanagpur. Rivers Kosi and Gandak from the north and Sone from the south join the Ganga. River Damodar flows through the picturesque Chotanagpur plateau and its valley is the Rohr of India. In the fertile plains, rice, sugarcane, oilseeds, gram, maize, jute, barley and wheat are cultivated. Under the soil, Bihar has either ruins or minerals.

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